Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A Noob's Guide to Medics

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • A Noob's Guide to Medics

    As the title suggests, I've written a small guide not only for noobs but... well... I consider myself still a noob in a complex game like PR.
    That said, a lot of the information in there is based on information I've received from fellow TG-members either directly in action or through the TGU (Special thanks to Delta*RandyShugart* and Katanama). The rest is my personal experience and/or opinion.
    Sorry for any grammar or spelling mistakes, redundant or repetitive information.



    A Noob's Guide to Medics




    Role:


    The medic is a vital part of nearly every infantry squad. He (Or she) is responsible for the combat strength of the entire squad and therefore a key element for success. There are, of course, some squad layouts which don’t use medics such as small recon or sniper-teams and mortar crews. The standard infantry squad has to be as versatile as possible, ready for most threats it might encounter. Small scratches and heavy wounds happen fast and can cripple an entire squad if not treated fast and in an appropriate manner.

    So what are the responsibilities of the medic?
    Always remember that the medic is a supporter. He is neither point man nor marksman. Most medic kits feature iron sights or reflex sights which make engagements over more than 50-200 meters very difficult. The medic should always ask one question: “What can I do to help the squad? What can I do to make them function and act in the best possible way?” Most of the time the answer is: “Keep them alive and healthy” Sounds simple enough, but it’s often difficult to accomplish. If the squad is in good shape and there’s no need for patch-ups or revives, the medic should of course engage in the fight, but never in a way that could compromise his safety and therefore the safety of the whole squad.


    Behavior:

    As mentioned earlier, the medic is not perfectly fitted for most fights and should therefore always know his place in the squad’s formation. Depending on the formation he should be somewhere in the middle or the back.
    In a column-formation a good place for the medic (based on a 6-man squad) is No. 4 or 5. If the squad encounters resistance, he can quickly take cover and treat wounds and wait for the fighting to end to revive the wounded. The medic shouldn’t be the last man in the formation, since the last position is responsible for covering the back of the squad. If someone is attacking from the rear, the medic shouldn’t be the one taking one for the team.
    In a line-formation the medic can either be close to the middle on either flank or stand back a little. The latter is a good choice in open terrain since it reduces the chances of getting picked up first by enemy fire and maximizes the time to get into cover and support the engaged squad with treatment and/or smoke grenades.
    Those tips are, of course, overruled by specific squad leader commands, but it’s always a good thing to suggest it. If the SL (Squad leader) doesn’t order a specific order for the formation, just adapt and do what is necessary.

    As with every role in a squad: Communication is essential!
    Speak with your squad mates; tell them if you need ammo boxes to refill your epipens and how to behave while being treated or after being revived. When it comes to medical treatment and revives, the medic has the say. He has to be aware of the situation, the cover, the location of the enemies (If he has no visual on them, he should already know by squad communication or ask his mates for specifics) and possible ways to retreat. As always, that does not mean that SL orders are overruled or unimportant. It’s simply necessary for the medic to tell the squad what to do if they are down. They only look at a bloody sky, while you are up and can evaluate the situation. Tell them to stay down if the cover is sufficient, to crawl/go/run into a specific direction shortly after reviving, to get into cover or whatever else the situation dictates. Use short and clear sentences, the situation is chaotic enough.
    “Fox, head straight southwest after the revive” is enough. Even with blurry vision the poor guy can look at his compass and head to the right direction.
    “Mat, cover to the east” is perfectly fine.
    Just give them an idea of your needs to help them in the best way possible and they will know what to do.

    If a squad mate is just slightly hurt, decide if the situation allows a quick patch-up or if he has to suffer for a couple of seconds more until you find cover. Don’t get stressed if someone sounds pushy, fighting gets everyone exited. It is up to you to stand up for your opinion of the situation and to inform your mates of the best possible procedure.


    Attack:

    As noted above, the medic shouldn’t be at the front. He shouldn’t get involved in situation in which he can’t really help the squad or will probably just get shot.
    Restraint is often better than giving in to your urge for shooting. You have 5 guys in your squad who are better suited to take out enemies. Let them. Killing the enemy is not your primary assignment; it’s your secondary at best.
    In some situations however, the medic can be a very valuable asset for direct attacks. Because he is mostly equipped with iron or reflex sights he can easily take out enemies on close range. Mostly on huge open-terrain maps where most of your squad mates are equipped with ACOG sights, an iron sight can make a difference when storming a building or a bunker. (Especially if there is no rifleman specialist in the squad) However, if not specifically ordered to do so, stand back and support instead of just running into an ambush.
    If your squad suppresses a target, help them if possible. You don’t have to hit an enemy, just take enough shots at his location to ensure that he keeps his head down and doesn’t get a chance to engage.
    In short: Restrain yourself, back up a little, don’t pop your head out of every cover just to get a good look at incoming bullets, support the squad with indirect or direct fire whenever applicable and safe and always remember your primary role as a medic. Also, keep your spacing! Don’t huddle up with the rest of the squad if you can retreat into secure cover. A single grenade can take out multiple people and you don’t want to be in the blast radius when you are the squad’s only hope for survival.


    Defense:

    Whenever the squad is defending an objective or location, the medic’s place is in cover and depending on the space a couple meters away from any engaging squad mate. As always, the medic has to make sure that the squad stays alive and healthy. If possible, the enemy should never realize he’s even there. If a squad mate gets hurt, he should be approached in cover and treated fast, before returning to a safe spot.
    Stay in cover, stay out of sight, heal and revive your squad mates and make sure that they are in good shape.


    Healing:

    First things first, a wounded medic is a non-functional medic. The medic can heal himself by looking down while standing and using the first aid kit, or by looking up while being prone. (Note: Sometimes the little cross on the right of the screen doesn’t show up, even though you’re healing yourself) This tactic should only be used when safe and necessary. If there’s no time or cover, just throw a field dressing on the ground and use the little push to advance.

    Also make sure to finish the job. Especially while being prone and behind your mate; movement can interrupt the healing process. Listen for the ripping and swishing of the bandages and if necessary, get closer to make sure he’s ready for action again.

    When a squad mate gets hurt, both the situation and the degree of the injury decide about the medic’s actions. If it’s just a scratch and the squad is heavily engaged, a field dressing may suffice. (A responsible squad mate will always know when it’s best to use their own field dressing and when it’s necessary to retreat into the medic’s care) If the injury is severe the injured will most likely take cover and either wait for the medic or approach him. Treating an injury is always a risk while being engaged, so it’s absolutely essential to do it at the right time and the right place. The medic and the treated should remain in cover or seek cover before and while treating the injury. Afterwards the medic should return to his safe spot. (In very heated situations it might be a good idea to tell your squad mate that he’s good to go as soon as the treatment is complete in order to not waste any time)


    Reviving:


    Reviving is the most risky part of the medic’s duty. He has to approach the wounded squad mate, use an epipen and heal the soldier. After being wounded the revived squad mate lacks situational awareness and also the ability to fight at full strength due to the blurry screen, so it’s absolutely mandatory to choose the right moment to revive.
    If only one squad mate is down, the rest of the squad can easily suppress the enemy and provide fire support. The medic should wait for the right moment, and depending on the situation either approach the wounded slowly in cover or make a run for it. (Of course the former would be better)
    If the squad was ambushed in the open or while crossing a street for example, smoke is always an option. The situation, the medic’s experience and/or the SL should decide whether it’s necessary to smoke the location. Smoke grenades however are a double-edged sword. While providing excellent cover, they also draw a lot of attention, especially on open ground. They should always be thrown between the enemy and the squads and/or wounded squad mate’s location. The closer the smoke grenade gets to the enemy, the more it will affect his vision. Also smoke needs some time to form. It takes up to 30 seconds until the smoke is fully and evenly deployed for maximum effect.

    The worst case scenario is of course if the whole squad is down with only the medic left.
    In that situation the medic can be proud of himself, because he has done his job right not to get killed. And it’s the moment to prove his worth.
    The most important thing is patience. The medic shouldn’t lose his head and rush to the rescue because the whole thing will most likely end with the medic joining his fellow squad mates face down in the mud. It’s important to keep a cool head and evaluate the situation. How far away is the enemy? Will the enemy advance and look for survivors? Will the enemy soon move out or is it likely that he will remain stationary? Is there a way to get to all or at least some squad members without the enemy noticing?
    All those questions and many more have to be considered in such a situation and sometimes, a medic can’t really do anything about it. Even if it’s difficult and frustrating, sometimes the only thing a medic can do is waiting and hiding.
    If the enemy passes, even if it’s just by 10 meters, often the best thing to do is to keep the finger off the trigger and just let them go. If it’s a single enemy, and he is polite enough to come looking at the wounded bodies of your friends on the ground, it should be clear what to do.
    But a single medic can only do so much and it’s mostly not a good idea to engage a whole squad – even on close range.
    As soon as the enemy has passed or moved on, the medic can safely revive and heal his squad mates and inform them about the enemy movement. The best part about it is that this time your squad will most likely approach them from behind. It’s perfect for an ambush and retribution.

    If the squad went down on open ground of a ridgeline, both crawling up to them and smoking the area can work. In the end that’s your decision. Think about it before you act and your squad will thank you.

    It might also be a good idea to think about who to revive first. The threat will dictate whom to revive first (E.g. LAT or HAT if the squad got hit by a vehicle). Often it’s a good idea to start with the squad leader, since he will be giving orders how to deal with the current situation and needs time to evaluate.


    Technical side note:
    Hills are your enemy. Unfortunately the BF2 engine sometimes doesn’t work the way it should. If a squad mate goes down on a hill or slope, there’s good chance that his body will slide away from his kit and actual position. The BF2 engine sometimes displays the body and the according hit box at the same place. So even if you aim your epipen right at the chest (The best part to hit) you might hit nothing but air.
    If the slope is not too steep and the body slid only a bit, throw a field dressing at his body. It will force the engine to re-calculate the body’s real location and it will ‘flip’ back. Even if it slides again, just hit the spot where the body appeared. It should work now.
    If the slope is very steep, use resuscitate to push the body further down until it hits even ground and comes to a stop. Then reviving should be possible.
    In some cases the engine will let you down and it won’t work no matter what you do. In that case, don’t waste all of your epipens, tell the wounded squad mate that you can’t revive him and inform your SL. He can put down a rally point.


    Insurgency:

    Playing a medic on insurgency is a little different. Some insurgency factions have combat medic kits, which are the same as in other game modes.
    Other factions however have civilian collaborators. They do not wield weapons (Only stones to annoy marines), but have access to resuscitate, first aid kits and epipens. On top they get grappling hooks.
    Civilian collaborators are very unique and I won’t explain their entire use and role.
    Often insurgency squads don’t need or don’t want a civilian collaborator, so when joining a squad on INS, the best thing to do is what you always should do. Ask the SL what he needs and wants.
    There are lots of tactics involving the civilian, from traps and luring the enemy to a ‘global’ support and medic routine which aids multiple squads or the entire team.
    Most importantly: Don’t get arrested.


    Conclusion:


    Medics are essential for the success of most squads and are a lot of fun to play. However it is necessary not to forget what a medic should be: a supporter.
    Even though support roles often don’t include hundreds of fired rounds and a kill/death ratio which makes your teammates gasp in disbelief, medics are great to play. It’s quite a challenging role to learn and very hard to master. More often than not it’s the medic’s skills which decide if a squad can advance or if they are forced to spawn back at a fob.
    Patience, situational awareness, a cool head and sometimes restraint are essential attributes of a highly effective medic.
    Crawling to a wounded squad mate while enemy bullets are flying over your head, getting him back on the feet and watching your squad succeed is exhilarating and very satisfying.
    The medic is one of the best ways to explore and experience real team play in a mature and tactical fashion - especially when played the TG-way.
    sigpic

  • #2
    Re: A Noob's Guide to Medics

    As a counter-point: Everyone is a rifleman.
    Leaving your medic in the corner can sometimes be detrimental because it's one less gun in use, and the medic should always attempt to clear the immediate area before even thinking about reviving. He's no marksman, but he's got a gun and it shoots just as straight as everyone elses'. Getting rounds down range can still be important when possible.

    While these are at times circumstantial, it becomes more and more necessary the less people are alive around you. I'm in no way suggesting the medic should go out of his way to get a kill, but there is no reason not to put some bullets towards the enemy when possible.


    Of course, if they act like most people do in a firefight (sit completely still poking out of the window only watching one area and is going to stay there until he runs his mag dry) then yeah, that'd be stupid. Just poke out, fire a few rounds towards them, get back into cover; don't expose yourself for more than a second, and don't worry about accuracy.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: A Noob's Guide to Medics

      Certainly true. I might have over-exaggerated the restraint, mostly because restraint is often something you have to really work on.
      So if you strive for an unrealistic ideal, you're gonna end up on a healthy level x]

      Sure, if everything goes right the medic can act almost as a normal rifleman. I included a part about suppression and I don't see that guide as a standalone bible for medics. It's more like an addendum to the basic infantry rules. When it comes to medic-stuff or above the normal squad rifleman routine... that's the way to go.
      But yeah... good point.
      sigpic

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: A Noob's Guide to Medics

        An outstanding post! One to be stickied. I take my hat off to you for taking the time and making it so lucid – especially, as I guess your native language is German. I have every respect for someone so handy in a foreign tongue and commend your skill; I am not so hot on my own language of French.

        I value and always have valued my skill as a medic. On top of SL, personally, I have taken some pride in this skill. And find your post near perfect.

        I’d like to therefore, add some comments, if that is allowed and also find the above posts handy, for all prospective Medic candidates.

        First pointer then, I believe it should be outlined the current PR aspect of if revived and downed in under a minute, you are dead. I don’t see this key fact unless I missed it. Perhaps the top.

        “If a squad mate gets hurt, he should be approached in cover and treated fast, before returning to a safe spot”. Pedantic note, I believe this should read “As fast as possible according to situation”. Fast means ‘fast’.

        ‘Defense’. A short chapter, covered more in depth in ‘Healing’. Perhaps you could reference this. This is often the hardest role with the most pressure, especially in tight corners.

        Smoke. Good point about attraction. Smoke grenade usage: common mistake is to throw them. Also, a quick skate across open ground in urban areas where you can use walls as cover to a revive (and across) may be more effective. The point is to act in accordance to the situation and outsmart the enemy. Sometimes, as you point out that means hiding and making them unaware of your location, sometimes that means employing cunning, like making unexpected moves. A medic is cunning and must employ this. Emphasise this. “The closer the smoke grenade gets to the enemy, the more it will affect his vision”. Smoke must be used to harass the enemies vision, not closest to it. Again this is about employing harassment and cunning to out wit the enemy, of course you want to block a field of view, or even decoy. The point is to employ Cunning: outsmart the enemy; don't be predictable.

        I hope that helps with some of my experiences. I am being pedantic in many cases. This is the best Medic role basics I’ve read. All would be benefited by reading it and its complexities. There is no absolute perfect way to be a Medic, the world can throw up what you dont expect or want at times, luck can not be on your side but your description which I think is clear and lucid makes a pretty perfect 10/10 on a description of how to be a 10/10 Medic. A must read.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: A Noob's Guide to Medics

          Thanks a lot! :]

          Critique is always important, especially when I write something. I tend to just begin without thinking too much about structure, so... yeah. x]
          There will be more points to add and I will edit the post a little later and either post an addendum or try to somehow integrate all the tips in the original text. Dunno yet... (to be honest, just too lazy to think about it right now...)

          Thanks again!
          sigpic

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: A Noob's Guide to Medics

            Wow that was a lot. Great guide Vouk but i kinda agree with Celestial the medic is a a rifleman and should use his gun to the best of his abilities like putting down suppresive fire and such.


            I am the Infantry FOLLOW ME!!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: A Noob's Guide to Medics

              Suppression is included in the guide and I agree, the medic should do his part. As long as it doesn't compromise his ability to aid the squad in his primary role.

              It also depends on the SL. Some want the medic to be in the middle of the action, others want him to be as far away from anything with a trigger as possible.
              In the end every player will have to decide for himself how to act in any given situation.
              sigpic

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: A Noob's Guide to Medics

                I think the gun part is covered in the most. A Medics' final responsability on this point is to know when to gun. Perhaps this is not emphasised, yes.

                NB: my last paragraph about smoke isn't clear at the very begining and end. The last part I guess the gist is made and like you am typed out by now. So blah. Anyway, I would edit this to include at the begining. A common mistake on all roles on all situations is to be too fast to throw smoke to obscure enemy vision, especially in advance/retreat and defensive situations. Smoke is a tool and must be thought out. An example of throwing smoke to declare position to the enemy has been already given. This is a problem furthered within the Medic role since this rolls over to they are expected to throw smoke, including they think it themselves. The stance of a Medic has already been outlined.

                ...and then go on about what I did (apart from the last in clarity but Blah again; I feel a good old game or two on a Friday night now).

                I very much apretiate the conversation with Celestial's obsvations and think that conversation a valid point and should be pointed out.
                Last edited by Taip3n; 11-12-2010, 04:24 PM. Reason: the NB

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: A Noob's Guide to Medics

                  I've been making something similar to this post, but never got around to finishing it up. You've covered a lot of what I was going to say, so props to you. However, I have three vital points for a newbie Medic that will make you, in my book, an amazing medic. Sorry for the length, but I hope this helps some new medics or even experienced medics out.


                  1. Knowing BF2 engines faults

                  You've pointed this out in your technical section at the end of your post pretty well. However, it is possible to revive almost every downed soldier in the game (I want to make a video to show the community that you can revive people in weird spots that most people give up).

                  If you want to make sure you will revive someone: Resuscitate or drop a patch on him and ask the downed player if his screen shows him moving position. If he is, then your epipen will revive him--everytime.

                  The reason for this, is the engine registers a moving object a lot easier than it registers a static object. This is why the medic has the resuscitate. The ONLY thing the Resuscitate action does is move a limp body. Therefore, if you want to have a more efficient use of your epipens, make the wounded body move before you stab the downed player with an epipen. You can do this be resuscitating it or dropping a patch on the body.

                  You've mentioned that hill/non-flat geometry is hard to revive on. You're correct on this, but I want to reiterate this point as it stumps A LOT of players, experienced and newbie alike. Once again, you want to get the body moving. However, and this is VERY IMPORTANT, sometimes the body will appear to be in one spot on your screen, but the server has it in a different spot. The server is always right. If this happens to you, your wounded player will be able to tell you that you are not on top of his wounded body. If you are both on mumble, it's very easy to find out if this bug happens as his voice will not be coming from the wounded body you are pushing around. Additionally, another member from your squad will usually be able to see that you are trying to revive 'air' instead of the player. That player can drop a patch on the wounded player and it should reset the wounded player on your screen. If not, you can resuscitate the ground where he should be and it most likely will 'pop' back into place. Some rare times, it doesn't pop back into where it should be. You might have missed the spot where it will pop back or you might have to give your kit to someone else who has a different view than you do to revive your fallen teammate.

                  Lastly, you can almost never revive a fallen soldier who has part of it's body inside a static object (i.e. a building, a ladder, a wall). You need to resuscitate away from the object until the body is out of the object. If you've tried and tried to get it out of the object and it doesn't appear to get out, then remember these words. When you are resuscitating a body out of an object, you'll usually see a pattern of what the body does. It will get to a point where it will look like it's out or almost out of the geometry, this is when (WHEN THE BODY IS MOVING) you stab him with an epipen. Remember, the body must be moving for this to work.

                  One last comment on this matter. Practice switching quickly from resuscitate or patch to epipen. If you do it fast enough, you have about .5-1.5 seconds to stab the body while he is still moving from your resuscitate.

                  2. Giving the downed soldier Situational Awareness before revive

                  If you are reviving a wounded soldier, the worst thing to see is your new revivee jump up and run towards the enemy fire and die. It is your responsibility to make sure the new revivee survives the first few seconds after a revive. The revivee will be low on health, unclear of his surroundings, and unaware of any enemies in the area. FIX ALL OF THESE PROBLEMS - NOT JUST THE FIRST ONE. Tell him the direction he needs to run, tell him if we're under fire, tell him what he's up against when he pops up. Do this on mumble if you're both on it -- otherwise do it on B-Voip -- but make sure you do it. The difference between a good medic and a bad medic is taking command over his revived soldiers. Forget the squad leader -- when you are reviving your a soldier, that soldier's life is directly in your hands and therefore YOU ARE THE LEADER. Lead him to safety. If he ignores you -- don't budge. You are the leader and if he wants to live-- he'll follow your orders until he is at full life.

                  3. The patch 'glitch'

                  Last advice to any new medic is the ability of a medic to drop a patch on a wounded soldier. If you've read everything else in this thread, you should know that it can serve the same purpose as a resuscitate. However, what hasn't been said and should be after I explained the last two things is this: it can be used a health boost.

                  When you need to revive someone and there are enemies in the area away of your squads position then dropping a patch on the wounded player is very important. Firstly, if you read the previous advice, you should know you are the leader now and need to direct the player where it's safe. However, when a fallen soldier is revived, he starts with a horribly black and white death screen, hardly any health, and an inability to sprint. If he needs to move position quickly, expect VERY SLOW MOVEMENT. However, at this writing, if you drop a patch under the infantry before you revive, he will get a 1/4 health bonus, his black and white screen on revive will be clear, and he'll be able to sprint to where you want him to go to.

                  Yes, you just heard me. Every temporary side effect of being revived will be revoked if you drop a patch on the wounded soldiers body. DO IT WHEN ENEMIES ARE AROUND.


                  Lastly, although it's the medic's job to get you up as wounded soldier -- if he is not doing any (or a few) of these things -- remind him. Tell him he's not on your body, tell him to drop a patch, tell him to resuscitate before stabbing you with an epipen, tell him there's a great thread on the forums he should read when he gets the chance.
                  "If you want to build a ship, don't drum up the people to gather wood, divide the work, and give orders. Instead, teach them to yearn for the vast and endless sea."
                  -Antoine De Saint-Exupery

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: A Noob's Guide to Medics

                    Damn, I knew I forgot something. I wanted to cover the part with the medic showing up on the wounded guy's screen. Thanks a lot!
                    Good and very important points. And please make that video! I'd love to get more dead guys up x]
                    sigpic

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: A Noob's Guide to Medics

                      This thread just gets better.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: A Noob's Guide to Medics

                        when you use a patch it brings their health up by 25% and will allow them to sprint ie. for cover, without blackscreen of doom.

                        :) I think you've got that though


                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: A Noob's Guide to Medics

                          Originally posted by Vouk View Post
                          Damn, I knew I forgot something. I wanted to cover the part with the medic showing up on the wounded guy's screen. Thanks a lot!
                          Good and very important points. And please make that video! I'd love to get more dead guys up x]
                          Ha. That's another good point. You should definitely expand upon that medic symbol showing on the map where a wounded teammate is in your previous post. I totally forget about that as most of my medics have been on mumble or at least someone near is on mumble and can guide the medic in.

                          I'll get on that video whenever I do medic, but that's not that often. Maybe I'll just go on a splurge of medic whoring for a week to get some footage.
                          "If you want to build a ship, don't drum up the people to gather wood, divide the work, and give orders. Instead, teach them to yearn for the vast and endless sea."
                          -Antoine De Saint-Exupery

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: A Noob's Guide to Medics

                            Originally posted by BoogyLoH View Post
                            I've been making something similar to this post, but never got around to finishing it up. You've covered a lot of what I was going to say, so props to you. However, I have three vital points for a newbie Medic that will make you, in my book, an amazing medic. Sorry for the length, but I hope this helps some new medics or even experienced medics out.


                            1. Knowing BF2 engines faults

                            You've pointed this out in your technical section at the end of your post pretty well. However, it is possible to revive almost every downed soldier in the game (I want to make a video to show the community that you can revive people in weird spots that most people give up).

                            If you want to make sure you will revive someone: Resuscitate or drop a patch on him and ask the downed player if his screen shows him moving position. If he is, then your epipen will revive him--everytime.

                            The reason for this, is the engine registers a moving object a lot easier than it registers a static object. This is why the medic has the resuscitate. The ONLY thing the Resuscitate action does is move a limp body. Therefore, if you want to have a more efficient use of your epipens, make the wounded body move before you stab the downed player with an epipen. You can do this be resuscitating it or dropping a patch on the body.

                            You've mentioned that hill/non-flat geometry is hard to revive on. You're correct on this, but I want to reiterate this point as it stumps A LOT of players, experienced and newbie alike. Once again, you want to get the body moving. However, and this is VERY IMPORTANT, sometimes the body will appear to be in one spot on your screen, but the server has it in a different spot. The server is always right. If this happens to you, your wounded player will be able to tell you that you are not on top of his wounded body. If you are both on mumble, it's very easy to find out if this bug happens as his voice will not be coming from the wounded body you are pushing around. Additionally, another member from your squad will usually be able to see that you are trying to revive 'air' instead of the player. That player can drop a patch on the wounded player and it should reset the wounded player on your screen. If not, you can resuscitate the ground where he should be and it most likely will 'pop' back into place. Some rare times, it doesn't pop back into where it should be. You might have missed the spot where it will pop back or you might have to give your kit to someone else who has a different view than you do to revive your fallen teammate.

                            Lastly, you can almost never revive a fallen soldier who has part of it's body inside a static object (i.e. a building, a ladder, a wall). You need to resuscitate away from the object until the body is out of the object. If you've tried and tried to get it out of the object and it doesn't appear to get out, then remember these words. When you are resuscitating a body out of an object, you'll usually see a pattern of what the body does. It will get to a point where it will look like it's out or almost out of the geometry, this is when (WHEN THE BODY IS MOVING) you stab him with an epipen. Remember, the body must be moving for this to work.

                            One last comment on this matter. Practice switching quickly from resuscitate or patch to epipen. If you do it fast enough, you have about .5-1.5 seconds to stab the body while he is still moving from your resuscitate.
                            I cannot stress enough how important this part is. Nice job, Boogy.

                            Originally posted by BoogyLoH View Post
                            Ha. That's another good point. You should definitely expand upon that medic symbol showing on the map where a wounded teammate is in your previous post. I totally forget about that as most of my medics have been on mumble or at least someone near is on mumble and can guide the medic in.

                            I'll get on that video whenever I do medic, but that's not that often. Maybe I'll just go on a splurge of medic whoring for a week to get some footage.
                            I can help with this if needed. ;)
                            CR8Z: "No, I've not been good, but as an American, I'm entitled to everything I want."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: A Noob's Guide to Medics

                              My personal opinion of medic, is it shouldnt exist at all, at least no revive, how realistic is it to be 'revive' in the middle of combat, while you have been shot by a .50 for example..... get stabbed by that magic needle then bang you are ready to fight again, without the medic kit people would be a lot more careful not to die, wich is more realistic, firefight would last longer and be harder....

                              And also , being medic can be very very boring at times, especially if you have a squad leader who thinks like you ,that medic should always stay in the back and not fight, dont get me wrong I like being medic sometimes, but sometimes it worst part in the game, especially when people keep dying all around you and expect you to revive them in a matter of seconds...


                              Conclusion: medic shouldnt exist in my book, but im no dev or tester....so
                              sigpic




                              Any problem on Earth can be solved with the careful application of high explosives.

                              Comment

                              Connect

                              Collapse

                              TeamSpeak 3 Server

                              Collapse

                              Advertisement

                              Collapse

                              Twitter Feed

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X