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  • New guy here and Specs guidance

    Pretty excited about acquiring a new hard copy of BF2 tomorrow which I solely will use for PR. I've seen tons of videos from the better known players on the TG server and think I can fit in well. Well... for a new guy that is. I'm a 29yr old mature gamer and have no issues following in-game orders from a SL so I think I'll do just fine in that aspect.

    My main concern is running the game at an acceptable level. I can run vanilla BF2 like a dream but PR demands a bit more from my understanding.

    I tried the PR forums but never got an answer (strangely) so I had plans to primarily play on the TG server and decided I'd sign up here and get some guidance if it's no trouble to anyone here.

    Here is my specs, I'm aware that it's an integrated card - that's my concern.

    AMD Athlon II P340 Dual Core Processor 2.2 GHz (rated at 2.6GHz)
    6GBs of RAM
    300GB Hard Drive
    AMD M880G w/ ATI Mobility Radeon HD 4250
    Windows 7 OS 64 bit

    If this is in the wrong forum section, I apologize... but some answers here would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

  • #2
    Re: New guy here and Specs guidance

    Processer is more then enough.
    Ram is more then enough.

    4250HD has 512mb Video ram.
    its similar to the performance of a ATI Radeon 9800 from 2003.
    minimum requirements for BF2 are the 8500 Radeon series. So im going to say you'll be pushing it for sure. because PR is more demanding.
    Thats just my opinion speculated from googleing the graphics card.

    But what im saying ultimately is it will work, its just a matter of how well

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    • #3
      Re: New guy here and Specs guidance

      This video will be very helpful to you, I used to this two compare a two computers and one with a video chip very similar to yours. I'm not certain if the extra ram you have over my old rig will help with the rubberbanding that you see at some points (where your player appears to jump backward when he's moving forward), but your video card ram at 512mb is not going to be enough to load all of PR's higher resolution textures into the 512mb buffer, even at low settings, so your card is going to hiccup sometimes as it attempts to swap texture information from your main ram/harddrive into the graphics card. This computer also plays regular BF2 like yours with no problems, stuttering, whatsoever.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XAaIo04hMxU

      This video also shows the 9800 Pro running as my gunner in another PR coop server. Same Full low settings, 1280x1024 resolution:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D94zp5QX-PU

      Considering your 29 and probably have some kind of decent income, my advice would be to go on ebay and just build a cheap desktop for PR. From this video and research I determined it was better to simply upgrade/build a new secondary computer from cheap used parts than really attempt to continue using that computer for PR. I was able to purchase a MSI motherboard, E6750 Core2Duo Processor, and 4GB of Ram bundled for $120, 500watt PSU $15 and a Geforce 260 Video Card for $85. All those numbers include shipping. I actually used the new card in my main computer and flipped the Geforce 8800 GTX into the one I was building; you can score this card on ebay for around $50. So you're talking probably around $25 for a harddrive, $15 PSU, $120 mobo/ram/processor, $50 gfx card, $40 for a used 15" LCD monitor on craigslist, medium/high settings. You'd be spending $250 give or take.

      For an investment in your PR experience I would definitely recommend it, otherwise you're going to have to run PR on full low settings. I'm not sure how well you understand building a computer but you should be able to find youtube videos demonstrating a simple installation.

      You can view the new ebay computer running on medium/high settings as the gunner in these following three videos. It also allows recording to a second installed harddrive at full 1280x1024 resolution with fraps at a smooth 30fps. It will play normally at 50-70fps.

      It's the right screen in this one:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxPoEwfg2JY
      Gunner in these two:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cei-xKQeM5U
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6juS-Stzrw



      "Inter Arma Enim Silent Leges"

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: New guy here and Specs guidance

        Originally posted by AdmiralKird View Post
        Considering your 29 and probably have some kind of decent income, my advice would be to go on ebay and just build a cheap desktop for PR.
        I'd say this is fairly bad advice. Unless you do no other gaming whatsoever and have no plans of doing so for the next few years, it'll probably be a better investment to get a decent gaming pc that'll last you a few years into the future, rather than buying something that wont run any new titles.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: New guy here and Specs guidance

          A five year old 8800 GTX and core 2 duo will run titles for about the next two three years. I've played Civ 5, Shogun 2, and other visually taxing games on this PC and sure stuff like ARMA 2 and the age old Crysis won't run at full settings but they have no problems getting 40fps at medium/high. There isn't a massive generational gap between low end PC's and new titles that used to exist ten years ago. People aren't spending money on new hardware like they used to. New Gaming consoles don't come out every five years either. The XBox 360 is already in its 6th year and no announcements have been made to the release of its successor. It's GPU is the equivalent of a Geforce 7800 GTX. Games are designed to run on mainstream hardware, they're designed to run for the most people possible and beautifully for those who can afford the best. Otherwise, the developers wouldn't make any money. You're not going to see titles that are Direct X11 exclusive that 'box out' older cards for many years, especially when the target point for most major games is to also run on consoles that are six, going on seven, years old.

          Advice to invest in a good Direct X11 PC isn't necessarily bad, if you have the money, but when the next gen of consoles come out in 2013/2014 you'll be dead in the lower end of the spectrum and probably want to upgrade again then. The life of the gaming PC you buy today is not going to give you the return of a gaming PC you bought five years ago. If you live on a marginally good old PC for the next few years then you can do a major upgrade when the new consoles hit and that PC will last you until the 2020's as games trend to focus on the processing and graphical power of that generation of mainstream hardware (consoles). It used to be that PC gaming had a much larger percentage of the total video game market, and with 3D graphics in their infancy, each new year would showcase a large leap in what was possible both visually and creatively in game design. New consoles were released every four, five years, each one bringing impressive new games, but these exponentially impressive increases declined and largely asymptote'd in the mid 2000's. And with more money to be made in consoles due to both PC piracy and lack of benefits to more powerful hardware visually and creatively, along with much higher development costs to push the boundaries of new PC hardware, developers are still focused on computational power of 2005, and will for the foreseeable future.
          Last edited by AdmiralKird; 06-06-2011, 05:41 AM.



          "Inter Arma Enim Silent Leges"

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          • #6
            Re: New guy here and Specs guidance

            Originally posted by AdmiralKird View Post
            A five year old 8800 GTX and core 2 duo will run titles for about the next two three years. I've played Civ 5, Shogun 2, and other visually taxing games on this PC and sure stuff like ARMA 2 and the age old Crysis won't run at full settings but they have no problems getting 40fps at medium/high. There isn't a massive generational gap between low end PC's and new titles that used to exist ten years ago. People aren't spending money on new hardware like they used to. New Gaming consoles don't come out every five years either. The XBox 360 is already in its 6th year and no announcements have been made to the release of its successor. It's GPU is the equivalent of a Geforce 7800 GTX. Games are designed to run on mainstream hardware, they're designed to run for the most people possible and beautifully for those who can afford the best. Otherwise, the developers wouldn't make any money. You're not going to see titles that are Direct X11 exclusive that 'box out' older cards for many years, especially when the target point for most major games is to also run on consoles that are six, going on seven, years old.

            Advice to invest in a good Direct X11 PC isn't necessarily bad, if you have the money, but when the next gen of consoles come out in 2013/2014 you'll be dead in the lower end of the spectrum and probably want to upgrade again then. The life of the gaming PC you buy today is not going to give you the return of a gaming PC you bought five years ago. If you live on a marginally good old PC for the next few years then you can do a major upgrade when the new consoles hit and that PC will last you until the 2020's as games trend to focus on the processing and graphical power of that generation of mainstream hardware (consoles). It used to be that PC gaming had a much larger percentage of the total video game market, and with 3D graphics in their infancy, each new year would showcase a large leap in what was possible both visually and creatively in game design. New consoles were released every four, five years, each one bringing impressive new games, but these exponentially impressive increases declined and largely asymptote'd in the mid 2000's. And with more money to be made in consoles due to both PC piracy and lack of benefits to more powerful hardware visually and creatively, along with much higher development costs to push the boundaries of new PC hardware, developers are still focused on computational power of 2005, and will for the foreseeable future.
            Well, if you're content with not being able to run any newer game maxed out, then it might be a good idea to go for a lower end PC. I built my pc a year ago (i5-750, ati 5870), and its already starting to struggle when maxing out newer titles such as crysis 2 or witcher 2.
            So yes, if you build a low end pc, you will be able to run some new games, but you'll never be able to see them in proper quality. Theres no telling how long you'll be able to just barely run the new games. For example, BF3 looks absolutely stunning, and I have a feeling it wont be very easy to run.
            However if you spend something like 5-600$ instead of 250$, you'll be able to buy a mid-range pc thats able to run everything pretty well.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: New guy here and Specs guidance

              Originally posted by Feriluce View Post
              So yes, if you build a low end pc, you will be able to run some new games, but you'll never be able to see them in proper quality. Theres no telling how long you'll be able to just barely run the new games.
              You'll be able to run ALL new games. I don't know where you're coming up with "some" which is like saying 25%. It's 99%. The Geforce 260, 9800, 8800 (which are almost the same, +/- 20% performance) are currently as of May 2011 the fifth, sixth, and seventh most popular graphics cards in use according to Steam. The 470/480 series are 12th and 15th. The 570/580 at #25 and #26.


              And yes there is a way of telling if you're going to be able to run future games. It's called understanding money, the market, and forecasting. The answer is at least two years at the minimum.

              Currently, Directx 11 cards make up 40% of the PC gaming market, and that doesn't mean that these cards are all powerful either, about half of these Directx 11 cards are the lower end cards of their series' that just have the compatibility for the selling point recognition of being a directx 11 card, but not really the power to run games on Directx 11 well. So if you release one of these games today you'll be alienating almost the entire PC gaming market, plus having a PR nightmare with so many customers complaining their cards wont run the game. A year from now you'll still be losing out on half your sales, two years a third, three years 20-25%. Even 20% is a huge portion of the market to miss, and no developer is going to neglect them.

              Second of all, Crysis 2 does not struggle at all on older systems: http://www.geforce.com/#/Optimize/Gu...s-2-benchmarks
              The 8800GTX/9800GTX/260 will all get between 50-68FPS on HIGH settings running at 1650x1050.

              So you're safe with an older computer for the next several years running almost all games on medium settings. Then when the new consoles hit, you take the money you've saved in the interim and get a new computer for $1600 that will last you the next eight years at a rate of about $200 per year of life. Not bad. Not bad at all. The best way to game on a budget is to sync your computer's expected life with the console cycle. Anything else and you're suffering from diminishing returns on your investment.



              "Inter Arma Enim Silent Leges"

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: New guy here and Specs guidance

                The laptop will end up having a rough time on detailed maps and with large groups of players.

                If you end up wanting help with new system specs there is an active hardware forum here, http://www.tacticalgamer.com/hardwar...re-discussion/
                |TG-12th| Namebot

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                • #9
                  Re: New guy here and Specs guidance

                  Wow. There's quite a debate going on here.

                  I think your system specs are fine, excepting that you may want to upgrade your video card. But try it out first and see if you can live with it. Then go build a super computer if you just can't get enough.

                  As far as getting along with everyone at TG, I don't think that will be an issue. There are lots of highly skilled players that play here and most if not all of them are willing to show a new guy the ropes. Just hop in a squad as a rifleman and ask the squad leader how you can help. Stick with infantry for awhile before you break out into vehicle warfare.

                  If money is no object, you might consider investing in a supporting membership with TG. This allows you to join a full server without having to wait for a spot. If your time is valuable as mine is, $8 month to get on the server whenever you want is pretty reasonable.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: New guy here and Specs guidance

                    Thanks a lot.

                    Appreciate the answers folks... while I know the online MP portion demands more I'm going to test out the single player portion of PR after some E3 festevities and see how my laptop fairs out and familiarize myself with some basic gameplay.



                    Originally posted by CR8Z View Post
                    If money is no object, you might consider investing in a supporting membership with TG. This allows you to join a full server without having to wait for a spot. If your time is valuable as mine is, $8 month to get on the server whenever you want is pretty reasonable.
                    I like the way TG runs and that is something I'll be looking into. Thanks.

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