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1st MIP Support Squad Forming Saturday Night Mar10

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  • 1st MIP Support Squad Forming Saturday Night Mar10

    Once again I will attempt to form a support squad that will attach itself to the primary 1st MIP squad tonight (Saturday, March 10, appox 8 pm EST onwards).

    Keep in mind that the primary 1st MIP's squad leader must be in our 1st MIP teamspeak channel.

    I will probably limit the support squad to non-1st MIP members, so as to encourage a larger number of 1st MIP members to participate in the primary squad.

    See below for further details.

    Two Squad Platoon (TSP) Methodology Revised March 10, 2007.

    The primary squad (platoon command squad) should immediately inform the CO of the TCP's operational status. Note that the squad leader of the primary squad is also the platoon leader. Orders will flow from the CO to the Platoon Leader to the SL of the support squad. The support squad SL should avoid breaking this chain of command.

    The platoon leader has command of the support squad.

    The CO is irrrelevant to the necessity or success of a two-squad platoon. The primary reason for establishing a two-squad platoon (TSP) is to create a stronger tactical force in the absence of a CO, the secondary reason is to counter the zerg-like behaviour of the enemy. A third and more obvious reason for forming a TCP is simply to create a stronger combat unit.

    Note that as it takes at least two squads to attack a flag, and two to defend a forward flag of strategic value, a CO will normally want 2 squads in any given arena of action. Thus an operational TCP will always compliment a CO's battle plan, and provide the CO with a valuable assest -- a flexible two squad combat/defense unit that has a higher level of inter-squad communication.

    A key to the success of the two-squad platoon will be in both squads starting out together. As a squad is best getting organized and starting out together, so it is with the TSP. This is not an absolute requirement, but logic suggests that simultaneous deployment is better than starting out on the opposite sides of the map when the main goal is mutual support.

    We must outfit the primary squad with the majority of 1st MIP members, as the platoon leader must not be burdened with extra training or communication issues. One of the strength of the 1st MIP is the minimal need for the use of the comm to direct fireteams. We need to maintain that strength so the platoon leader has a reasonably clear comm channel for inter-squad communication.

    Thus the support squad should be populated with new players and 1st MIP friends. There is usually plenty of 'friends' who want to join up with a 1st MIP support squad. Thus, we should limit the support team to no more than two 1st MIP members The primary squad must be the strongest squad, as it is the platoon command squad.

    Given that some nights see squad numbers rise and fall, we may need to shift platoon command between the two squad leaders, depending upon the roster of each squad at the time. Platoon command should be given to the more senior/capable squad leader unless the senior SL has fewer squad members or has less experienced squad members. The principle here is that the platoon leader must have the strongest squad.

    Inter-Squad Communication Protocol

    Note that the only inter-squad communication will occur between the platoon leader and the support squad leader. Chaos would ensue if all 12 squad members were communicating via teamspeak. 1st MIP methodology is biased towards reducing, not increasing, the use of the comm by squad members, thus freeing up the comm channel for extensive use by the SL and fireteam leaders. This bias will be preserved within the TCP.

    John.C and E-Male have been working on a PL to SL communication protocol designed to create a minimum amount of 'noise' within the comm channel. The two prinicples here are (1) respect the other's comm channel; and (2) less is more.

    (1) An intra-squad conversation must begin with a request to engage in communication. This ensures that an officer does not talk over an ungoing conversation within the other officer's channel. A request-to-talk is initiated with a simple 'squad X here' or 'support squad here' or platoon leader here'. Then wait until the reply 'go ahead' or more clearly, 'go ahead squad x'. If the other officer is busy in channel or in operations, a quick 'squad x HOLD' will suffice. No matter how busy the other officer may be, this 'squad x HOLD' reply should be given, so as to acknowledge the request for conversation.

    (2) Think about what you have to say before you say it. Use cardinal points, command language, and be specific, concrete, and concise.


    Notes:

    It is too early to render judgement on the two-squad platoon as we have yet to impliment it for any length of time.

    End.
    Last edited by E-Male; 03-10-2007, 02:35 PM.
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  • #2
    Re: 1st MIP Support Squad Forming Saturday Night Mar10

    This is a wonderful idea and gives way to a larger plan of attack: real fireteams. Fireteams are 3+leader IRL and 2 full squads would give us the ability to have a full 3 fireteams. This means each fireteam would be well prepared for combat with an ideal setup being:
    FT1-
    SL1
    Medic
    Support
    AT/Other

    FT2-
    SL2
    Medic
    Support
    AT/Other

    FT3-
    SF/Assault
    Medic
    Support
    AT/Other

    This way, we have a full compliment of medics in each fireteam, as well as the ability to rearm in combat, leadership and AT/Grenade support. It also gives way to a much broader scope of movement to contact. But thats something for later discussion.

    I'll be there tonight. Whether I'm in the support squad or 1st-MIP squad, so long as theyre working in tandem, its cool. It's now become my preferred method of play. :)

    Might I also suggest that if we can gather enough volunteers for a TSP (meaning a full 12 people) that we require comms through teamspeak as there is no way for two squads to communicate with in-game VOIP.

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    • #3
      Re: 1st MIP Support Squad Forming Saturday Night Mar10

      Originally posted by Ferris Bueller View Post
      This is a wonderful idea and gives way to a larger plan of attack: real fireteams. Fireteams are 3+leader IRL and 2 full squads would give us the ability to have a full 3 fireteams.
      Will certainly look for you tonight, Ferris. Please see the note in the initial post regarding Inter-Squad Communication. Also, note that the 1st MIP has a highly evolved fireteam methodology that will be maintained in the TCP. While three four-member fireteams within a TCP is an interesting idea, teamspeak will not support this without creating extensive 'noise'. It is also simply too much to get 12 members, many who will come and go through a night, to be on TS. The TCP methodology will continue to follow 1st MIP fireteam S.O.P.s for both squads.

      In developing the TCP, I want to change as few variables at once as possible. Once we have an effective TCP and have run many trials on it, then we can introduce FT innovations beyond what we are already working with in the 1st MIP (currently we are working on a slightly modified FT command system that allows bravo FT leader to operate with greater independance from the SL).

      Nonetheless, thanks for the comments and interest! See you in-game,
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      • #4
        Re: 1st MIP Support Squad Forming Saturday Night Mar10

        Might I also suggest that if we can gather enough volunteers for a TSP (meaning a full 12 people) that we require comms through teamspeak as there is no way for two squads to communicate with in-game VOIP.
        Your question is answered here.

        Chaos would ensue if all 12 squad members were communicating via teamspeak. 1st MIP methodology is biased towards reducing, not increasing, the use of the comm by squad members, thus freeing up the comm channel for extensive use by the SL and fireteam leaders. This bias will be preserved within the TCP.

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        • #5
          Re: 1st MIP Support Squad Forming Saturday Night Mar10

          I will be there tonight E-male.

          Fire teams in 1stMIP

          So far we have used two different setups:

          1) Two fire teams; Alpha and Bravo. Bravo led by squad leader as support fire team, Alpha led by squad sergeant as strike force.

          2) SL and two fire teams; Alpha, Bravo and SL. Each fire team has its own fire team leader (FTL).

          =============================

          I realized that using second system is causing some problems: a) Three team leaders (A1, B1 and SL) is too much for a single comm channel, especially for a dynamic game like BF2. Max number of team leaders must be kept at 2 for efficient comm. b) Changing from one system to other is causing confusion.

          Attention to E-male and other 1stMIP SLs,

          From now on, lets use just one standard system. Setup 1 gives a 1stMIP SL flexibility to attach his fire team to Alpha or position fire team members anywhere he wants. Therefore we actually dont need the setup 2. You have all you need in the first one:

          a) Personally lead bravo team if you prefer to get involved in combat. This will give you "lead by action (=by being a pointman)" ability which is the most efficient small-unit leading method.

          b) You want to stay back and coordinate the battle? No problem. Either attach Bravo to Alpha and give fire team command to A1 (Sergeant). Or give a task to Bravo (flank, distract, move to, etc). There are only 2 Bravo fire team members, it will not be a problem for them to stay cohesive. In other words, Bravo doesnt need a new FTL.

          Remember,

          Keeping fire teams too separated will cause many problems. Whenever we get involved in battle on two fronts, things get crazy and chaotic. Try to keep fire teams at suppress/flank distance. One unit (squad), two fire teams and one battle at a time

          There is one exception though; Observation posts. For a zone defense, fire team members can be positioned to provide a 360 coverage with distance between them. The important point is, they are supposed to observe, NOT engage when they spot enemy. Here is a simple defensive procedure for 1stMIP SLs

          1) Assign defensive/observation positions to ALL threat directions

          2) Defensive position designation (Squad...current spots...defensive position 1)

          3) When a contact report is received, group a fire team or squad (depending on the strength of enemy force) to flank/ambush incoming threat (you can use the move marker to group). Other units must hold their observation spots in case enemy is distracting from one direction to hit from another.

          4) Give "squad...take defensive position 1" order after threat is neutralized.

          5) If we use two squad platoon system spearheaded by E-male, fire teams of each squad can be kept closer to each other.
          Last edited by John CANavar; 03-10-2007, 05:27 PM.

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          • #6
            Re: 1st MIP Support Squad Forming Saturday Night Mar10

            See the following thread for a Video AAR of a Two Squad Platoon action from March 10.

            http://www.tacticalgamer.com/battlef...s-finally.html
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