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za's Guide to teamwork v.3 - W.I.P.

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  • za's Guide to teamwork v.3 - W.I.P.

    First off welcome to za's Guide to teamwork v.3 - W.I.P. (work in progress)

    Disclaimer - I do not claim to be good at grammar nor the English language. Grammar Nazi's beware.

    All of the following words are SUPPOSED to help you understand teamwork and the like. I'm not very confident in my English skills so I was hoping I could get some feedback/help from the PR community. The overall plan I have so far is to do 3 'pre-versions' starting with v0.3.

    v0.3 = Looking for major content changes - Am I headed in the right direction?
    v0.6 = Looking for content and major grammar changes/whatever else
    v0.8 = Any last minute details that need polishing
    v1.0 = The final product

    After you are done reading if you could give some feedback in the form of answering the questions below that would be excellent. Of course all of this is optional and you are not required to participate!

    Code:
    Does the content make sense?
    Did you learn anything? (simple y/n would suffice)
    Do you see anything that needs changing/rewording?
    What can I do to make it better?
    I have left in all the notes I made for myself (NTS = note to self) so you guys could see what I'm thinking about certain sections.


    I have plans to do a follow up squad leader guide, but i'm moving July 1st so I'm not sure if I will get around to doing that anytime soon.




    ---- GUIDE START ----

    The overall objective of this guide is to help give you a better understanding of what your team expects from you. As well as what you should give to your team. Notice how I didn't say 'what you should expect from your team'. In any given round there should be communication, effort, politeness and teamwork to the best of everyones ability. Don't go into a round thinking 'we have to win at all costs'. Go into a round hoping that you have a fun-filled teamwork oriented round. The true essence of Project Reality is having fun while working as a team - NOT winning.

    The quality of teamwork may be measured by analyzing the effectiveness of the collaboration in the following ways:
    • Communication
    • Cohesion
    • Goals
    • Situational Awareness


    **Communication**

    Communication is key a to success. You just need to open the door. I cannot stress enough the need for communication amongst a team. Without communication all you have are assumptions on what other squads are going to do. While this could work, it's in your best interest to communicate with other squads. Project Reality was created with teamwork and realism in mind. Teamwork was not an after thought.

    Objective: Define what role each of these plays in game

    < Types of communication >
    • Mumble
    • Commander
    • Typing
    • VOIP


    Mumble - Mumble can play a very important role in Project Reality. Mumble fills in the gap for when there is no commander as squad leaders can relay information among themselves in the squad leader channel. Not only that, but it allows you to converse with those around you - regardless of squad assignment. This can be very important when trying to find a down and wounded comrade as well.

    Commander - The commander is a great means of communication when available. The commander has access to information that you do not. The commander has comms with all squads, the lauch button for arty strikes and a UAV in the sky to help find new adventures for you. The commander can break and make a team in regards to teamwork and coordination. His words should be feared, admired and followed at all times.

    Typing - Typing is the least effective way to communicate and should only be used as a last resort. Text is very easy to lose or not notice amongst the chaos that can be Project Reality. Typing at most, should be used to relay grids to transport chopper pilots or CAS pilots that cannot hear you in mumble. All of that being said calling out targets in chat is still a good idea. Make it short and simple when doing so though.

    VOIP - VOIP is the most common and effective way to communicate with those individuals in your squad. The squad leader also has a direct line and can contact the commander at any time should he so choose.

    **Cohesion**
    The ability for any given team to work together to the best of their ability. To work cohesively you need to have teamwork and dedication. Individual squads must be dedicated to doing their part or the whole team will fall in and fail around them. Do not confuse squadwork with teamwork. There is a difference. Below is a list of things that will help you on your journey to find cohesion and teamwork alike. (NTS: add more?)

    Definition: Cohesive - cohering or tending to cohere; well integrated; "a cohesive organization"

    < Cohesion breakdown (no pun intended) >
    • Coordination
    • Balance of Contributions
    • Mutual Support
    • Effort


    Coordination - the art of coordinating and getting 32 different people to work together for a common goal or result. Team-wide attacks launched on the same target at the same time, attacking multiple flags at the same time with all the teams assets/units and multiple squads getting inserted into the same flag zone simultaneously are all examples of excellent coordination. Communication is an excellent way to coordinate a team. When things are going bad for your team it's probably time to have a talk amongst the squad leaders and get a plan together of what direction all of your following actions will be directed toward.

    Balance of Contributions - There should never be a single squad that is doing most or all of the work for any team. If you see a squad constantly doing all of the hard or boring work, offer to help or relieve them. If you are running an infantry squad a good goal would be one FOB per hour. (NTS: this whole thing sucks)

    Mutual support - Project Reality holds a sort of "if you wash my back, i'll wash yours" feel to it in the teamwork aspect. The more you help me the more I'm willing to pay it back and then some. That being said a single squad cannot win a game alone. Other squads are going to need your help and you will need theirs as well. If they ask for supplies, see if you can help. If another nearby squad needs a medic, send yours. If another squad needs support, see what you can do to assist them. (NTS: could use some slight work)

    Effort - Basic effort is required on all fronts to get any sort of teamwork out of a team. Basic effort might include, but not limited to; Following orders, actually paying attention to the game or task at hand, not multitasking while in PR and staying aware of your surroundings. (NTS: add more?)

    **Goals**

    Goals; have them. As the game starts to progress or even before hand you should have an idea of what you want to do. Whether it be as simple as capping and holding x flag or simply. Without goals you are not trying to accomplish anything and thus are of zero use to your team. Anything beyond the basic goals you should have is going into strategy and is not the focus of this guide.

    < Basic goals to have > (NTS: name Basic goals or Basic goals to have?)
    • Role
    • Assets
    • Kit layout
    • First plan of action
    • Spawning


    Role - Every squad has a basic role they play in any given round. If you want to go infantry you are going to be capping flags, killing and engaging enemy infantry squads and in general most of the work. When going infantry you need to know how you are going to get to your planned objective. It's also a good idea to make sure there are no identical squads for the role you plan to fill. Infantry squads would be exempt from this for the most part since there are few maps when you can have too many infantry squads. Below is the 'natural order' of how roles should play out in game.

    The natural order:
    Recon - relay intel, call for CAS, attach themselves to infantry squads to provide overwatch and engage targets of importance. APCs - give transport, ammo and support to infantry squads. Armor - protect everything smaller than them, cover flanks and engage enemy armor. CAS - attack lazed or called in targets and engage in dogfights with other CAS - not attack random non-lazed/marked targets. Trans pilots - drop ammo when called for, transport infantry squads to and fro as well as standby for when they are needed for evacs. Logistics - drop repairs for armor, give ammo when called for and build FOBs if the situation calls for it.

    Assets - Assets can be anything from tanks to logistics trucks. If you plan to build a FOB off the start you're gonna need crate(s) to do so. Whether you get the crates from an air drop or logi truck, plan ahead. Know what kind of transportation your squad is going to take. Not knowing or guessing wrong can cost you valueable time that your team might not have.

    Kit layout - At the start of every round the squad leader should be giving a general idea of what he squad can expect from the round thats about to begin. Kit layout is a very important part of the start of any round. If someone spawns with the wrong kit it can set back your squad and creates more unneeded confusion. Be sure to listen to your squad leaders during this time to avoid any confusion.

    First plan of action - The first plan of action is the first plan you are going to take at the start of any given round. This would typically involve going to X flag and capping or building a fob in X place. Know what you are going to do at the start of the round and plan accordingly.

    Spawning - Make it VERY clear where you want your men to spawn. Repeat yourself at least a few times to be sure they heard you. A soldier spawning at the wrong spawn can put your squad and in turn your entire team at a disadvantage. A single squad that misunderstands the plan or spawns in the wrong spot and screw up the entire plan that was just formed. Also, informing your squad that 9 is default for parachute might not hurt either.

    **Situational Awareness**

    Being aware of your surroundings is possibly one of the most important things you can learn on the battlefield - be it real or pixelated. That being said you cannot be of any use to your team if you are not aware of your surroundings. You should be able to ask a squad if they need help before they have even say they have contact at their location. Below are some ways to do just that. (NTS: this makes everything below make no sense)

    < Ways to be situationally aware > (NTS: this whole section fails hard....)
    • Terrain
    • Map
    • Communication


    Terrain - Terrain might be something you normally overlook when not cursing at the fact that you can't get up a hill you could easily climb in real life. In certain instances you might look to be a quick two minute jog to the nearest squad, but in reality with the correct (or wrong I guess) terrain and the lack of a rope can take you upwards of five minutes to maneuver around. Knowing how long it will take you to get from A to B is very important. Terrain should always be observed, never admired.

    Map - You are equipped with a BluFor tracker, regardless of position on the battlefield. There should be zero reason for you NOT to know where friendlies are on the map. Knowing where friendlies are at all times helps you do a few things. One of those being to help avoid friendly fire. Another is so you can keep track of where friendly squads are on the battlefield and adjust your strategy to help the team from there.

    Communication - What, communication again? Yes. With the number of ways another squad leader can contact you there should be zero reason for you to not know or another squad not to know your position or objective for the time being. If your objectives change - inform the team. If you need help - inform the team. The team should know when you take contact, when you have to piss and when you just dropped chips all over the floor and the dog ate them, theres no reason for them not to. You have the means of communication to do so. (Your team does not really need to know that stuff, but you get the idea).

    Final advice
    The battlefield is ever-changing and never static. Don't be fooled into 'they won't attack us' or a similar mindset. Battles have been won and lost with such a bad mindset. If you're new and don't know how to play but are eager to learn, ask someone who looks like they know what they are doing. The PR community as a whole is more than willing to take a few minutes out of the game to show you or explain something to you that you don't know. In fact, if you ever need help with understanding something about PR, want tips on squad leading etc. feel free to xfire (zebraactual) me.

    At the end of the day this is a game, if you're not having fun you are doing it wrong.

    Cheers.

  • #2
    Re: za's Guide to teamwork v.3 - W.I.P.

    You should probably mention something about self-restraint in the mumble section. Because just like any other device in PR, spamming it will get you killed and is thoroughly annoying.

    The 189th Infantry Brigade: Taking the 'the' out of psychotherapist since 2010.

    XFire: mrthomasking

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: za's Guide to teamwork v.3 - W.I.P.

      Originally posted by zebra.actual View Post
      First off welcome to za's Guide to teamwork v.3 - W.I.P. (work in progress)

      Disclaimer - I do not claim to be good at grammar nor the English language. Grammar Nazi's beware.
      I didn't see obvious issues. NJ.

      Originally posted by zebra.actual View Post
      **Communication**
      May want to change the color to white or a darker blue, its tough to read with this background, IMO.

      Originally posted by zebra.actual View Post
      Mumble - Mumble can play a very important role in Project Reality. Mumble fills in the gap for when there is no commander as squad leaders can relay information among themselves in the squad leader channel. Not only that, but it allows you to converse with those around you - regardless of squad assignment. This can be very important when trying to find a down and wounded comrade as well.

      Commander - The commander is a great means of communication when available. The commander has access to information that you do not. The commander has comms with all squads, the lauch button for arty strikes and a UAV in the sky to help find new adventures for you. The commander can break and make a team in regards to teamwork and coordination. His words should be feared, admired and followed at all times.

      Typing - Typing is the least effective way to communicate and should only be used as a last resort. Text is very easy to lose or not notice amongst the chaos that can be Project Reality. Typing at most, should be used to relay grids to transport chopper pilots or CAS pilots that cannot hear you in mumble. All of that being said calling out targets in chat is still a good idea. Make it short and simple when doing so though.

      VOIP - VOIP is the most common and effective way to communicate with those individuals in your squad. The squad leader also has a direct line and can contact the commander at any time should he so choose.
      This would be a good spot for the "Do's and Dont's" or shall we say the 'ettiquette' of each of these communication systems. Examples:
      Mumble - You can figure out on your own what team is in a channel. Don't spam everyone by asking what side your on just because you can't be bothered. (sry, personal grievance)
      Commander - As an SL, if not receiving orders, ask for them. Ask if you should support that squad to your left flank, or hold a defensive position. Have an objective.
      Typing - The 'J' key is not your friend. Unless there is a game or server issue requiring discussion with an admin on the other side, there is almost no need for it to ever be used.
      The 'k' key should also be used only for communication that cannot be achieved via the SL in Mumble channel.
      VOIP - When in doubt, hold your comms. The SL is tasked with monitoring no less than 3 voice channels: Mumble, Commander, and the squad. Let the SL lead. If you have suggestions about how to fight during a firefight, type in squad chat. Your SL will be barking orders, and your squad mates are trying to call out contacts and incoming grenades. We don't need 'suggestions' mucking up chat into a useless white noise.

      ADD - Squad leader Radio. - Squad leader should whenever possible, use squad leader radio to mark targets and make requests. To the degree that Voice comms are not even used unless the SL Radio request goes unnoticed. Marks identified on the game map are the best form of communication you can ask for. "AA in g4k2".. 20 seconds later is not visible to that chopper ferrying supplies, or the CAS bird covering your butt. A mark on the map is continuously visible to your entire team. Help your team help you.

      Originally posted by zebra.actual View Post
      Mutual support - Project Reality holds a sort of "if you wash my back, i'll wash yours" feel to it in the teamwork aspect. The more you help me the more I'm willing to pay it back and then some. That being said a single squad cannot win a game alone. Other squads are going to need your help and you will need theirs as well. If they ask for supplies, see if you can help. If another nearby squad needs a medic, send yours. If another squad needs support, see what you can do to assist them. (NTS: could use some slight work)
      I think the saying is, 'You scratch my back, i'll scratch yours'... I won't get into 'washing' another man's back... lol

      Originally posted by zebra.actual View Post
      Effort - Basic effort is required on all fronts to get any sort of teamwork out of a team. Basic effort might include, but not limited to; Following orders, actually paying attention to the game or task at hand, not multitasking while in PR and staying aware of your surroundings. (NTS: add more?)
      Maybe talk about seeing big picture. Example: Do we need to take a truck out to the battle, or can the trans squad ferry us? (Saving tickets and resources). Can a medic revive me, or should i respawn with squad leader at the nearest FOB?

      Originally posted by zebra.actual View Post
      Kit layout - At the start of every round the squad leader should be giving a general idea of what he squad can expect from the round thats about to begin. Kit layout is a very important part of the start of any round. If someone spawns with the wrong kit it can set back your squad and creates more unneeded confusion. Be sure to listen to your squad leaders during this time to avoid any confusion.
      This is incredibly important during insurgency battles. As Bluefor, there is never a need to take a HAT kit or AA kit into the game. Its loss will only hurt your team due to the kit being in enemy hands.
      Do you really need an AR in close quarters? A Grenadier? Generally not, a rifle will do just fine. Think of the enemy having the kit you are going to drop. The next time you assault that position, that insurgent has and AR keeping you supressed, while the Grenadier is lobbing HE down range at you. Think ahead.

      Nice job Zebra.
      Q: How many members of Congress does it take to change a light bulb?
      A: None. There is nothing wrong with the light bulb; its conditions are improving every day. Any reports of its lack of incandescence are delusional spin from the liberal media. That light bulb has served honorably, and anything you say undermines the lighting effort. Why do you hate freedom?!?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: za's Guide to teamwork v.3 - W.I.P.

        @third: i'm aware of the colors, but they change from forum to forum since none have the same color scheme. I'll try and find something more suitable though.

        As for the communications section the objective was to define what role each of those types of communication play in game. Getting into what you suggest would deviate from that and turn it into a more 'you should do this'. I however will keep this in mind and play around with some ideas and see what I come up with.

        Originally posted by ThirdSin View Post
        I think the saying is, 'You scratch my back, i'll scratch yours'... I won't get into 'washing' another man's back... lol
        I laughed. Dunno how I came up with that one. I changed it to make is seem a little less weird.

        I went through again and changed/reworded a few more things. I didn't update the post though. I'm still looking for any big change suggestions anyone has. Thanks for the feedback thus far.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: za's Guide to teamwork v.3 - W.I.P.

          Undoubtedly you will see it too, but Wickens just put up a good one you should check out.
          Q: How many members of Congress does it take to change a light bulb?
          A: None. There is nothing wrong with the light bulb; its conditions are improving every day. Any reports of its lack of incandescence are delusional spin from the liberal media. That light bulb has served honorably, and anything you say undermines the lighting effort. Why do you hate freedom?!?

          Comment

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