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CO's - going for the throat

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  • CO's - going for the throat

    I'm a fairly defensive player, and thus as I embark on this promise to have a go at CO'ing, I see myself setting up more defensive lines with low risk tactics. This is not surprising from an introspective point of view - my dad taught me to play chess when I was 4 (at the local laundrette), and I reatin a love for the game. Back when I used to compete at national tournaments I would always tend to play a Scicilian or English (often leading to a reversed Scicilian) opening. For those not familiar these openings tend to be highly defensive, based upon waiting for an oponent to make a mistake, or by getting bored and hastily sending themselves to their death before I would counter attack.

    So I am always going to draw upon this for playing CO at BF2 - it would be impossible to stop me. Then again I do like the sexiness behind going right for the throat - but how viable a tactic is this? Often I have seen teams do this, and in their failure have spent so much time regrouping that they have all but put themselves into a losing position due to ticket bleed.

    The second match against HOC was a demonstration of this, where at an 8v8, with 100 tickets each we were down to around 60 after the first attack failed. Similarly in the TG vs TG scrim we had two major throat attacks stopped in their tracks. Not to say that these were the wrong plan (I mean no insult), but I am trying to understand the role better. In Bane's Mashtuur plan we had a good chunk move upon the hill. They failed to accomplish their missin enough due to the high number of defenders, and as a result we were around 100 tickets down and bleeding before we were attacking the flags again with conviction. Similarly Munchkin's plan to take out the West point in the first parts of the game met a brick wall (and my squad was reloacted quickly afterwards).

    Yet on the other hand we have plans like Sassy's Songhua that worked really well. So overally is this a worthwhile tactic, and what (if anything) can we do to prepare for such a thing?

  • #2
    Re: CO's - going for the throat

    Keep in mind that you're not dealing with pawns and rooks, but rather, intelligent leaders in their own right. The successful CO will be able to quickly evaluate their squads and deploy them appropriately. Sending A squad to the rally point is not the same as sending Tarpan's squad to the rally point...

    And on a side not, I'd like to see you on www.redhotpawn.com There are a few of us that play there... http://www.tacticalgamer.com/showthread.php?p=353239
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    • #3
      Re: CO's - going for the throat

      I think it depends somewhat on the circumstances. What I think you need to manage an effective early thrust is a dual purpose for the attack and a contigency plan.

      For example if you're MEC on Zatar. You begin the round by focusing a major assault on the airfield. It would be a good idea to also start a pair of utility squads in your UCB to capture flags. In a best case scenario you capture the Airfield. If you can't capture the Airfield then you will still stall the USMC which is the second purpose. The contigency plan is the Utility squads. They should capture as many bases as possible so if you're defeated your squads can fall back into defensive positions. Even if you don't capture the Airfield there is still a chance that you'll stall the USMC advance long enough that the Utility squads capture a majority of the flags allowing your team to quickly switch from offense to defense.

      I'm not entirely sure what happened on Mashtuur. There was only one squad defending that hill. It was mostly 3 in the hills and 3 on the buildings/flag. It worked very well to have the squad divided like that because B could see nearly the entirety of the hills. After anyone was spotted it was just a matter of getting them into a crossfire between the players on the hill and those on the buildings. I think you guys just got unlucky and lost some Squad Leaders early in the attack.

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      • #4
        Re: CO's - going for the throat

        Originally posted by Wulfyn
        So I am always going to draw upon this for playing CO at BF2 - it would be impossible to stop me. Then again I do like the sexiness behind going right for the throat - but how viable a tactic is this? Often I have seen teams do this, and in their failure have spent so much time regrouping that they have all but put themselves into a losing position due to ticket bleed.

        Similarly in the TG vs TG scrim we had two major throat attacks stopped in their tracks. Not to say that these were the wrong plan (I mean no insult), but I am trying to understand the role better. In Bane's Mashtuur plan we had a good chunk move upon the hill. They failed to accomplish their missin enough due to the high number of defenders, and as a result we were around 100 tickets down and bleeding before we were attacking the flags again with conviction. Similarly Munchkin's plan to take out the West point in the first parts of the game met a brick wall (and my squad was reloacted quickly afterwards).

        Yet on the other hand we have plans like Sassy's Songhua that worked really well. So overally is this a worthwhile tactic, and what (if anything) can we do to prepare for such a thing?
        I think an important concept to be used in throat attacks is that of drawing the enemy away, and then ramming in hard to the real objective.I only just realised that about 30 seconds ago, and I'm starting to see where my plan went awry.

        Sorry to focus so much on my Oman plan, but it's an example that comes easily to my mind. IMO, I should have realised that the 7th would group large numbers of troops on the river, due to its tactical importance, as well as the far eastern beachfront flag. As a result, the plan should have been to snatch and grab a beachfront flag, something that would be unexpected, and prevent massive loss of virtual life to the scale that was experienced.

        Sassy's plan was extremely successful due to the jumping about which occured. She cleverly used troop deployment from the choppers to seize CPs behind what was expected to be the front line, and when the enemy tried to recapture the minor objective - *WHAM* - straight for the jugular.

        [conduct][volun][drill][sg-c1][tpf-c1]
        |TG-2nd|munchkin
        Nec aspera terrent.

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        • #5
          Re: CO's - going for the throat

          Sweet mother of..
          You got the map to that?
          Were you bitten by some kind of radioactive tactical genius koala that passed its commanding skills on to you? Cos that's what it sure seems like. I'm very impressed.

          [conduct][volun][drill][sg-c1][tpf-c1]
          |TG-2nd|munchkin
          Nec aspera terrent.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: CO's - going for the throat

            Originally posted by Bommando
            Have a look at our plan and you will see that this wasn't quite contiguous with our initial plan.
            OMG... why oh why do timezones exsit??? I would give anything to play out a tactic like that.

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            • #7
              Re: CO's - going for the throat

              Originally posted by Wulfyn
              So I am always going to draw upon this for playing CO at BF2 - it would be impossible to stop me. Then again I do like the sexiness behind going right for the throat - but how viable a tactic is this? Often I have seen teams do this, and in their failure have spent so much time regrouping that they have all but put themselves into a losing position due to ticket bleed.
              This tactic works best on maps like Karkand where the USMC has nothing to fear from failure. All maps with one UCB and no real ticket bleed actually favours the bold. Capture the Opfor 'main' and you can essentially disregard the rest of the flags. In fact, there is no reason _not_ to go for the throat, the ROI is on a scale that would have Steve Ballmer change his pants. On more balanced maps, a push-strategy has a larger chance of blowing up in your face and tickets become more of a factor.

              -=[dMw]=-Cain

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