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Room Clearing Technique (US Army Ranger School)

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  • Room Clearing Technique (US Army Ranger School)

    Thought this may be interesting now that SF includes a lot more indoor fighting. I don't know if many of us have the patience to practice this, but with some discipline I think it could be quite effective. The trick would be to practice reps with your squaddies and be able to master each position.

    The material below is as taught at the US Army Ranger School, excerpted directly from SH 21-76 United States Army Ranger Handbook (no copyright).

    --[excerpt]--

    Members of the breach/entry team should be numbered for identification, communication and control purposes.

    (1) The number one man should always be the most experienced / mature member of the team, next to the team leader. The number one man is responsible for frontal and entry/breach point security.

    (2) The number two man is directly behind the number one man in the order of movement and is normally responsible as an entry or clearing team member.

    (3) The number three man is normally the team leader and is responsible for initiating all voice and physical commands. The team leader must exercise situational awareness at all times with respect to the task, friendly force, and enemy activity.

    (4) The number four man is normally the automatic rifleman and is usually equipped with an M249 SAW. He is responsible for rear security and is normally the last man into the room and can respond with a tremendous amount of firepower, should the team leader require him to do so.

    Entry point position and individual weapon positions are important. The clearing team members should stand as close to the entry point as possible, ready to enter.

    Rooms are never entered with less than two men. The #1 or #2 man may shout "Short Room" if the room is too small for the whole team.

    Team members must clear the point of entry to eliminate the enemy threat and allow remaining team members to move into the room. An entry point acts as a fatal funnel since it is the focal point for enemy weapon acquisition.

    Team members move away from the entry point and assume positions within the room where the threat can best be eliminated. Any threat is eliminated or neutralized as individual team members move to their points of domination, not once you get there. Never move faster than you can accurately engage targets.

    Four-Man Stack: The #1 man must act the quickest and make immediate decisions. The #1 man enters the room eliminating the immediate threat and has the option of moving left or right, moving to one of two corners. His ability to move to a corner will be determined by obstacles, size fo the room, and the enemy situation. As he enters through the entry point, he can visually check one of the corners and determine if there is an immediate threat. If there is a threat he moves to the threat, eliminating it as he moves to the corner. If no immediate threat exists in the first corner, he should consider "button-hooking" to the [next] corner to avoid being shot in the back.

    The #2 man moves along the wall in the opposite direction of the #1 man. Both the #1 and #2 man clear the breach point, their immediate threat areas all while moving to their dominating corner of the room. The #3 man goes the opposite direction of the #2 man inside the room and at least one meter from the door. The #4 man moves in the opposite direction of the #3 man. All team members stop when they have cleared the door and have reached their point of domination within the room.

    The #1 man enters and goes left or right based on immediate threat location. The #2 man goes the opposite direction of the #1 man and engages all targets of opportunity in his sector. These actions normally result in the room being "divided" in half and 100% of the room being scanned except for the upper levels. The #3 man enters, clears the fatal funnel to the left or the right, and primarly scans overhead areas. The #4 man enters and goes opposite the #3 man and continues to provide rear security as the situation dictates.

    --[/excerpt]--

    One practice the Rangers employ is breach capability. This would typically be the #3 or #4 man, who breaches the obstacle (blows the door, etc.) before the #1 and #2 men rush in. For SF, SLs should have the #3 and #4 men throw grenades, flashbangs, smoke or teargas into the room while the #1 and #2 keep their rifle kits in hand. After the grenades blow the #1 man should go.

    If anyone actually practices this shoot me an PM, I'd love to hear how it goes.

    Boot.


  • #2
    Re: Room Clearing Technique (US Army Ranger School)

    Bad idea. If the guy guarding your back has a SAW, he's got the worst gun possible for long range engagements. You're better off with the SAW in front and an assault rifle in back, so the rifle can deal with threats from far away as you enter the building.

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    • #3
      Re: Room Clearing Technique (US Army Ranger School)

      Nice post, I used that technique in Rainbow 6 but BF2 doesn't need room clearing since :
      A - the rooms arn't big enough
      B - no hostages so you can just grenade the small rooms to kill the enemy

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Room Clearing Technique (US Army Ranger School)

        Originally posted by TychoCelchuuu
        Bad idea. If the guy guarding your back has a SAW, he's got the worst gun possible for long range engagements. You're better off with the SAW in front and an assault rifle in back, so the rifle can deal with threats from far away as you enter the building.
        Well, that's what would require practice and perfection in the game. Exact real life tactics may not work in the game, but that doesn't mean that they can't be adapted to the game.

        I think that what can be taken away from the article is the idea of each squad member having an area of responsibility when assaulting a flag -- not necessarily just a room. Think of a squad rolling in to a flag area in an APC and everyone piling out. Instead of people just running around in random directions, inviduals could know which direction they are supposed to be covering and clearing.

        Think of the river flag on the Gulf of Oman. Your squad rolls up in an APC or a pair of buggies. Two guys go towards the little house, two past the house up to where the armor spawns, and two over towards the boat house. Room clearing techniques don't necessarily have to apply to only rooms, enclosed flag areas work as well.

        The broken down buildings at construction sites in the game work as well. Pile up the stairs and each man knows what area he should be checking, instead of just running up and hoping you don't get shot. And it wouldn't have to be practiced ahead of time - if the squad is particularlly disciplined, the SL could just call out, "Joe up and left, John up and right, Mike up and turn around, Jimmy watch our backs and across the way, Sally up and around the wall, I'll come up and help clean up the mess."
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        • #5
          Re: Room Clearing Technique (US Army Ranger School)

          I've always wanted to do a room clearance like that in a game but i don't think BF2 is the game to do it in. As Preston said a grenade can fix all your problems.
          _____________________



          ---

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          • #6
            Re: Room Clearing Technique (US Army Ranger School)

            Originally posted by Steel_Penguin
            I've always wanted to do a room clearance like that in a game but i don't think BF2 is the game to do it in. As Preston said a grenade can fix all your problems.
            I completely agree in vanilla, but there are some spots in SF that give the room defense some more advantage. The main one that comes to mind is the Church at Devil's Perch, where the upper walkway means you can't just run in and focus on the ground defenders. I've seen some good defenses dug in there -- a couple in the bell tower to watch the flag, a couple on the ground floor to take the hits, and one or two on the walkway to back them up.

            One other spot is the upper Palace rooms on Warlord. These rooms are too big and include some cover that make grenades less effective. Here, gas and flashes should help but without coordination your own team would run in and get flashed as well. Maybe this will be more relevant when/if SF gets a bit more popular.

            Anyway, I posted it fairly verbatim from the book and of course you'd need to modify it for most situations. Some of the points are pretty good -- even if all you get out of it is "#1 man don't just step into the doorway and shoot your gun." I got TK'd trying to take the TV station on Sharqi Penn the other night just that way, which is what made me think to post. If my man had moved INTO the room and let the other 2 of us in, we would have been a little more Dirty Dozen, a little less 3 Stooges.

            And for the record, I was Shemp.

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            • #7
              Re: Room Clearing Technique (US Army Ranger School)

              On Devil's Perch, you can just hurl grenades onto both the walkway and the open area in the middle, then run in like crazy. Since the bright area makes it sort of tough for people to immediately see you if they have NV on, and the dark areas make it impossible to see you if they have NV off, all it takes is some fancy gunplay and you're set. The palace rooms are a bad, bad, bad place to try the ranger thing. You're much better off hurling in grenades; if there are still enemies left, you send in one sacrificial person to chuck grenades everywhere, then when the enemies are busy you just run in.

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