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Sledding guide to Squad cooperation.

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  • Sledding guide to Squad cooperation.

    Some points on how to cooperate with other squads, please add all your insights, this is a topic that hasn't been discussed a lot so any input is a plus.
    These apply most to infantry heavy games without a CO, but are useful in all games

    1) Know what the other squads are doing and formulate your objective based on that.

    Throughout the game, check the composition of the different squads. Tg? Aggressive/defensive SL?
    Then check the map to see what they are doing. Now Identify the flag you need to be at. If enough flags are secure, just position your squad between two friendly flags. Relay this mission to your squad. E.g.: "hold this rock and keep enemy from flanking squad #x and #y."


    2) Retreat!

    Instead of defending a flag against overwhelming force.
    If you are being overrun and have no supporting squad nearby, try and retreat and team up with an attacking squad or do anything you can to regain strength in numbers.


    3) Flank!

    Flanking a guy behind a rock is ok, and fun, but the real business is flanking on squad level. This will allow a moderately skilled squad to wipe out a top notch squad in 30 seconds.
    This is so underused as well. Just make sure you are always a good distance from the squad you are trying to work with. You will have to talk a lot to your squad to accomplish this.
    You will have to tell them multiple times to stop whatever they are doing to accomplish this, especially when it matters; when you are under fire. Especially in the next situation, worth its own x).

    4) Do not ever attack in a straight line with two squads on top of each other!

    I see this soo much on my map, while I shouldn't be seeing it at all. In some situations where speed is vital and a flag is undefended one could argue that it is useful to have two squads run in at once, but in that case, one squad would probably be enough.

    When you see this happen, give your squad a waypoint on the other squad's flank, and keep telling them to go there until they do. Also tell them why, so they can better accomplish their duty e.g. "stay on the left side of the other squad, keep some distance from them.

    I you encounter heavy resistance, and have not moved your squad out of the mob, you have good chances of seeing both of your squads dead in seconds. however if you have flanked, you can take all the time you want to attack that flag. Just if you surround a heavily defended flag with two squads, you will get so many kills that
    a) you will probably get the flag eventually
    b) you will get enough kills to cancel the bleed you are suffering (you must be bleeding since you are attacking :)).

    5) Divert resources on defence.

    When at a back flag, send out the impatient ones in your squad to help out near (not on!) another squad. A win win situation there. Try and keep them close enough to come back and help out at the flag though.

  • #2
    Re: Sledding guide to Squad cooperation.

    I) COMMUNICATION! (not chatter)
    Where does your squad spawn?
    What kits do you need to be effective?
    Where is the enemy (numbers, direction)?
    How should you move as a squad?

    II) SL should stay out of harm's way! It does nobody any good if the Squad Leader is always dead or under fire. Offer a safe and effective spawn point for your squad with precise instructions on where to go when they spawn.

    III) Avoid the flag that 90% of your team is at. Go for a back flag or a strategic objective. When you see a blueberry patch of friendlies on your Mini-map, Move out... Cover an important flank - Sometimes the most important place to be is NOT at a flag.


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    • #3
      Re: Sledding guide to Squad cooperation.

      Yes, communication with the other squads is VITAL. Example: tonight on the PRM server, our squad was the only one doing anything useful, despite the pleadings of our squad leader to the others, who insisted on ignoring us and each other. Not only did we experience significant tactical issues, we had at one point our own (gunned) AH-6 laying down some heavy fire on the better portion of our fighting force, and a squad leader was flying it! Furthermore, the vehicle situation was a mess. I suppose having a commander would've helped coordinate, but I'm not sure.
      The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. ~
      I have a tendency to key out three or four things and then let them battle for supremacy while I key, so there's a lot of backspacing as potential statements are slaughtered and eaten by the victors. ~
      Feel free to quote me. ~

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      • #4
        Re: Sledding guide to Squad cooperation.

        Originally posted by ednos View Post
        Yes, communication with the other squads is VITAL. Example: tonight on the PRM server, our squad was the only one doing anything useful, despite the pleadings of our squad leader to the others, who insisted on ignoring us and each other. Not only did we experience significant tactical issues, we had at one point our own (gunned) AH-6 laying down some heavy fire on the better portion of our fighting force, and a squad leader was flying it! Furthermore, the vehicle situation was a mess. I suppose having a commander would've helped coordinate, but I'm not sure.
        It would have, especially if the CO or SL's were in Teamspeak. I sat in teamspeak tonight in the Project Reality channel just in case. I received 1 complaint of a CO not doing their job and a request to change a map because it was too big. If an SL does not follow orders and can't explain in a decent way to a CO why they can't, this should be communicated and that person will be taken care of. If you feel that your team is missing out by not having a CO, hop in the role. At the end of the round, let your SL's know that one of them should step up for the next round. Ultimately, you control your experience on the server as much, if not more then we do especially as we are talking about all things you control.

        Lucky Shot

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        • #5
          Re: Sledding guide to Squad cooperation.

          2) Retreat!

          Instead of defending a flag against overwhelming force.
          If you are being overrun and have no supporting squad nearby, try and retreat and team up with an attacking squad or do anything you can to regain strength in numbers.
          YES!
          It's about time someone said this. Most people are very opposed to the very principle because if they get killed 21 times (times six squad members) while defending one flag, they don't realize the consequences to the score. People need to realize just because when you die in BF2, you don't die in real life doesn't mean when you die in BF2 nothing bad happens.
          Let me provide an illustration, On 1-31-07, I had a squad of six fairly good players, only one TG of course (axis), we started the round on a wide flanking maneuver of beach, we capped it, and then another squad moved in to defend , so we moved out. We attacked and captured the castle. We got in defensive positions just to get blown out of them by, helicopters, jets, APCs, infantry. The flag was a deathtrap, but the castle only has limited entryways so for the most part we could hold the flag, but it just wasn't worth the cost. So I typed "This position is untenable, fall back and rally at marker", I moved out a rear entrance and no one followed. I typed again "We need to retreat", still no one. I think we ended up losing the outpost, and thats when I finally was able to assemble my squad. They just didn't comprehend the notion of disengaging. But I would also like to know what some of you guys think about fall backing on an assault. The same map, after the castle incident we went on another flanking mission to the beach and got pinned down by a rock about 150m out (I had ordered one guy to scout the flag area and report back, but it seemed almost everyone of them attacked at that time), is this a good time to lay out smoke and fall back to a rally point? Or should we hold our ground and wait for them to get tired hoping they don't flank us?

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          • #6
            Re: Sledding guide to Squad cooperation.

            You have a BIG advantage when defending a flag at even numbers and up to even undermanned by 20% as your medics don't have to run as far and you spawn much closer. The defenders eventually have to put themselves in a very exposed position (The flag) which will allow you to continue to bleed them IF you have an SL who can stay alive.

            It is important to know when to fold the cards and go elsewhere, but I generally won't leave a flag still in my posession unless there is a better flag for me to be at. I will give you a couple examples of real examples of when I have lived for a better fight.

            Berezne had our squad attacking the radar station against an in house squad and we just couldn't get the necessary push. I watched the guys attack from the bridge on the west and failed. I went north where they attacked from the rivers edge and were finally cut down at the road. It was obvious that they had more guys and the enemy had the advantage of height. We weren't going to take that flag. Recognizing this, I took a quick look at the map, noticed the farm was now a back flag behind the Radar Station and the Watermill for the enemy and figured it was lightly defended. So what did I do?

            I hung out for a second or two on the hill, let the guys spawn back in and sent them on "One Last Attempt" to take the Radar Station. Was it a waste of tickets? Probably. But it accomplished a couple things.

            1) I didn't have 5 guys wasting 2 minutes walking behind me.
            2) I didn't have my guys plus the enemy following behind me.
            3) They could have taken the Radar Station against all odds.
            4) It allowed me to move into position much quieter then it would have with 6 guys.

            We took the farm flag from 4 defenders and that flag was worth just as much as the flag we couldn't take from the Radar Station.

            A second example is a round the other night on Dnipro Sunrise. We held the PowerPlant flag. I had some recognizable names on my squad but was finding even though I had good squad mates, for whatever reason it wasn't gelling into a good squad. We were spread out, people weren't covering eachother, revives weren't there and it was clear that the opposing squad moving was better than us. So after a brave fight all around the flag and staving off the defenders for a good couple minutes I had the option to attack the flag or go to the flag they came from (likely lightly defended Town flag). Based on how loose the squad was and how they performed, I felt we weren't going to get that flag back.

            So we swam the river, took down the lone tank and took the flag.

            So the flip side, how do you know when you have a good squad? This picture answers the question nicely, no doubt as to why our squad performed well this round. They spot, they stay together, plenty of ammo and med packs. No one dies in a squad like this.



            Lucky Shot

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            • #7
              Re: Sledding guide to Squad cooperation.

              Originally posted by Lucky Shot View Post
              They spot, they stay together, plenty of ammo and med packs. No one dies in a squad like this.
              Lucky Shot
              Because everyone does their job.

              DB

              «That looks like a really nice house except for that horrible bathroom.» Donrhos

              | |





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              • #8
                Re: Sledding guide to Squad cooperation.

                Lucky Shot, that is a very interesting post, that illustrates your point very well. I generally agree with what you say but there is something that I think is worth questioning further.
                I hung out for a second or two on the hill, let the guys spawn back in and sent them on "One Last Attempt" to take the Radar Station. Was it a waste of tickets? Probably. But it accomplished a couple things.

                1) I didn't have 5 guys wasting 2 minutes walking behind me.
                2) I didn't have my guys plus the enemy following behind me.
                3) They could have taken the Radar Station against all odds.
                4) It allowed me to move into position much quieter then it would have with 6 guys.
                Point one in particular, I would contend that two, even ten minutes maneuvering into good attack position is worth the time and effort. A lot of people when faced with a lengthy walk would just grab the fastest thing they can find, a jeep, APC, what have you. And this is a good choice in some situations like the beginning of the round, attacking an undefended flag or when speed is absolutely necessary. But sometimes I'm not sure people realize the stealthiness and capability they sacrifice in a vehicle. In most cases one of two instances incur, everyone ditches the vehicle, probably the worse choice because you give your position away on the map and you are probably a bit behind enemy lines to the point that that vehicle is your only means of evacuation if necessary. The second instance is you use the vehicle as a fire support platform, obviously a much better choice. Nonetheless a jeep can be taken out in one AT or properly placed AP round. In my mind this basically eliminates the jeep as a tool assaulting a well to moderately defended flag. I think the most valid reason on the list is number three about it still be possible but unlikely to capture that flag. But to the same degree despite the fact this is still a game I think in order to achieve more tactical play we should always try to play under the doctrine that there is no respawning. Of course there is, and theres no changing that but I most of the time try and play like it's my life and make decisions assuming it's actually my safety at risk. To some this negates the purpose of the game, but to me, if I'm playing like that and I'm in a squad playing like that I find the game much more enjoyable, even if my score is not that high, and I am not some 'superhero' busting into the enemy's base and massacring them.

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