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Infantry Fundamentals - Flanking, engaging etc

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Celt View Post
    We will no doubt get into an armor-infantry team coordination thread at some point.
    On page 3 of threads, guess it's time to bring it back to the front.

    https://www.tacticalgamer.com/forum/...nized-infantry

    "You milsim guys are ruining the game."
    |TG-42nd|Wicks-Today at 4:47 PM

    No it was fine mate I'm just an *******

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    • #32
      Well ain't I just behind the times.

      That PR video gave me a small chubby... I wont lie. I have no clue how I had never even heard of PR before Squad came out.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Celt View Post
        More importantly, on the SL thing. Here is a new trick that should be relatively easy.

        I don't know what it is about you folks who like to SL in game. Whenever you get into the map or get all tied up on coms, you all like to stop in the middle of an open field and silhouette yourselves. Often with sniper fire coming in. Celt of course, who faithfully follows SL around making sure he stays alive, often has to remind them that cover is their friend.

        So, SLs. When you go into map mode or get into an argument on the net with other SLs, do poor ole Celt a favor before he has a heart attack. At the least go prone in some concealment. Preferably, find some cover. I'll be your local security while you do what you do, but for gods sake stop channeling your inner Patton and posing in the open or silhouetting yourself on a ridgeline. Its bad for my health.

        You know who you are.

        *COUGHASTACOUGH*
        *COUGHCRAZYDRUNKCOUGH*

        ​​​​​​​

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        • #34
          Lulz @ Crawlingeye.

          I've watched that eccentric Brit a few times and I've actually seen the episode you linked before. He is entertaining to say the least. I enjoy his Greco-Roman military stuff as that is squarely in my academic wheelhouse. He has a graphic novel coming out about Hannibal and the 2nd Punic War for those of you who are into that kind of shtuff.

          He definitely keeps his videos fun and entertaining.

          That particular video will certainly be apropos when the British faction comes out. Might even be 'meme-able.'

          Regards,
          Celt

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          • #35
            Hah! Thought I recognised that picture! Sorry for continuing the off-topicness here. But If you like Lindybeige's content let me recommend the best of the best for those who don't know him yet: http://www.dancarlin.com. He has some epic podcasts about various historical periods and wars. His podcast on e.g. WW1 (over 10 hours I estimate), and on the east front in WW2 have changed my view forever. Thought me more about the war that happened in my backyard (WW1) then I ever learnt anywhere else. I've spent weeks listening to his content, having listened to all of it. Don't regret one second. May be the best podcast on the net.

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            • #36
              We play a lot of urban maps. People need to learn how to split up and move down a street. It should be split 50 50.. Half the squad on 1 side half on the other. A medic on each side. Always with a guy watching the rear. And the middle man on each side should watch the roof above the group across from them. I think this will give the most cover and safe movemnts

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              • #37
                There is a quote floating around attributed to some random American G.I. during the late WWII battle of Aachen (September '44.) Aachen was one of the largest urban fights the Allies had been involved in up to that point. The quote has held water up through the current conflicts as well.

                It goes something like, "I don't know why they call it street fighting. The street is the last place you want to be!"

                That's the gods honest truth and I see loads of people violate this pearl of wisdom all the time. Streets are sight line magnifiers. They are death tunnels. They are almost certainly covered by direct fire and act as obstacles to canalize you into kill zones. Only move on them as a last resort. I only try to be on them when, as a medic, I have to put the magic hands on someone.

                It is preferable to use the buildings adjacent to move in. They provide covered and concealed routes. I understand that in the real world, you can cut holes in walls to facilitate movement through one building to another and that that is impossible in the game. My point is just to use them as much as possible to move in. There is no excuse for NOT using the buildings as covered and concealed routes when available... even when enemy contact is not expected.

                If you are using the buildings to move in and must short halt for some reason, stick a weapon out of every orifice. Of the building you sickos. I'm working with juveniles.... sheesh. Anyway... including the 6'o'clock position that you originally entered from. Pro tip for doors and windows... don't be right up on the edge. Your muzzle sticks out and flags your position inviting hand grenades or gunfire as soon as you break cover. In the real world it helps mitigate detection from your muzzle flash, something we really don't have to worry about in the game. Bottom line...be well back from the hole to cover your sector.

                If you are in contact and must move down (hopefully not) or across the street... of course, use smoke. Now that I've given my opinion on streets during a gunfight, I think Crazy has a valid point in his movement techniques... with slight modification. Variations of the following are used as actual SOPs or TTPs in some real units.

                The larger element, lets just say squad for game purposes, splits into its two fire teams of 4. Each fire team takes a side of the street and watches the front of THE OTHER element. For movement, one team bounds along their edge of the street singularly or in buddy teams, over watched by the opposite side element while the stay behinds of their own team continue their overwatch of the opposite side. Once set, the bounding group assumes the security for the opposite side and the trail element moves up the street into the new building. Once the bounding team is reconsolidated, the other side of the street's team uses the same movement techniques to advance on their side of the street.

                Sounds complicated, but with a bit of practice it comes together and makes sense. Its actually pretty quick once you get it down pat, and provides a fair bit of security for movement.

                Regards
                Celt

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                • #38
                  Awesome posts guys. Yeah getting a squad to do that as a cohesive unit can be tricky without practice, usually because people start looking around trying to work out where they are relative to everyone else as if they're worrying about formations or something (not a bad thing, its just running before you can walk).

                  For me the best place to start is to simply get people thinking, as follows:

                  - Am I exposed and to where. Where is hard cover and to what angles of attack does it protect me. Where is concealment, for you and the enemy.

                  - Where would the enemy post up, where is their overwatch, where are their strongpoints. These are your threats

                  - Maybe I've seen the enemy or been given a marker. So relative to me where would they move to when they are attempting to flank/encircle me. Now get offline, ie anticipate and relocate, They are moving. Based on their last location and your position where would they flank to. Some of their force will be there.

                  - Most people are predictable. Not because they are stupid or bad players. No generally terrain will dictate position and movement patterns. Learn to read the terrain and get better at estimating travel time from A to B.

                  - If you know you're squad is barrelling forward and is being somewhat shortsighted, slow down and scan beyond them. They've probably attracted attention, look for the reaction

                  - Don't wait until you're confronted with a problem to start thinking, anticipate, have a plan and plan ahead.

                  As regards shooting from inside a structure, bang on Celt, there's some stuff in the Breaching thread here about using an offset from a window.


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