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  • A Post Worthy of Review

    Hello everyone!

    I just noticed in my notifications a post by Unkl, the Dean of TGU (Tactical Gamer University),

    https://www.tacticalgamer.com/forum/...-communication

    This has been beneficial to me, and I hope it will be to you!

  • #2
    The content is direct, quickly and with good information. Tks Asta85

    Comment


    • #3
      Agreed. Brevity is best.

      Comment


      • #4
        AMBIGUITY AND VAGUENESS: Striking the balance between Accuracy and Brevity

        Thomas Wasow of Stanford University defines ambiguity and vagueness as such:
        "Ambiguous expressions have more than one distinct meaning; vague expressions have a single meaning that cannot be characterized precisely. (It is of course possible for an expression to be both ambiguous and vague, if it has multiple meanings, at least one of which cannot be made precise). If expressions are thought of as picking out regions in some semantic space, then ambiguous expressions pick out more than one region, whereas vague expressions pick out regions with fuzzy boundaries." (https://web.stanford.edu/~wasow/Ambiguity.pdf)

        There should be conscious choice about brevity in non-basic commands. Brevity can leave openings for vagueness and ambiguity unless it's phrased perfectly, something which is very difficult to do under changing conditions and with different listeners. I prefer the rule that anything said should avoid ambiguity and vagueness, even if that means using extra time and words to make it as clear as possible the first time. Ambiguous or vague phrasings get people killed, and that just doesn't apply to video games, it applies to everything in life.

        In leadership roles, accuracy should always take the forefront to brevity, and the way to maintain accuracy is through removing ambiguity and vagueness. Vice versa the more rambling and drawn out a command is the more open to interpretation, aka, vagueness and ambiguity. When we speak for too long we are prone to back reference phrases we had used previously, and the more things we say the more references we create. This makes our communication more vague as complexity increases within the command or discussion. That's when brevity comes in.

        Learning to speak in a non-ambiguous manner is something that most people spend their entire lives learning to do and linguists argue if it's even important at all. Speaking creatively or deceptively actively uses vagueness and ambiguity to intentionally communicate something specific. When commanding troops on the battlefield though, you aren't a poet or a salesperson. Good leadership requires conscious language decisions to minimize ambiguity and vagueness. It's particularly important when giving direction or communicating with people at varying degrees of language competency, age, or from different social or cultural groups.

        If you're interested in working on ways to increase accuracy and improve brevity in both written and verbal communication try these sources for tips on how to reduce your ambiguity and vagueness:

        https://www.gvsu.edu/cms4/asset/CC3B.../ambiguity.pdf

        https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/...ue-expressions

        http://writingcommons.org/open-text/...void-vagueness

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Aufklarer View Post
          AMBIGUITY AND VAGUENESS: Striking the balance between Accuracy and Brevity]
          It's 11:33 PM EST, and the above was the most thought provoking piece of written or spoken commentary I've read or heard today. Thank you for sharing.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Pro-ActiveDeath View Post

            It's 11:33 PM EST, and the above was the most thought provoking piece of written or spoken commentary I've read or heard today. Thank you for sharing.
            You're welcome! I'm glad it was helpful and interesting for you!

            Comment

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